Tag Archives: bob dylan

Music Monday honors Bob Dylan ~ Subterranean Homesick Blues

It’s the second last Monday of the year, and my final music post of 2016. Bob Dylan concludes it with “Subterranean Homesick Blues.”

In addition to his influence on music, this song was one of the first “modern” promotional film clips, long before the rise of MTV. The original clip was the opening segment of the film Don’t Look Back, a documentary on Dylan’s 1965 tour of England. In the film, Dylan, who came up with the idea, holds up cue cards with selected words and phrases from the lyrics.

The cue cards were written by Donovan, Allen Ginsberg, Bob Neuwirth and Dylan himself.

In 2004, Dylan said the song was taken from Chuck Berry, a bit of ‘Too Much Monkey Business” and some of the scat songs of the forties.

Dylan has also stated he fell under the influence of the Beat scene, and it was Jack Kerouac’s The Subterraneans, a novel published in 1958 about the Beats, that may have been the inspiration for the song’s title.

Great song and video. Wishing you a stress-free week as we head into Christmas and Hannukah. 😉

~eden

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Music Monday honors Bob Dylan ~ A Hard Rain’s A-Gonna Fall sung by Patti Smith

This past Saturday, Nobel laureates gathered on a stage in Stockholm to receive their awards. Bob Dylan, who won the prize for literature was absent. During the awards ceremony, singer Patti Smith performed Dylan’s song ‘A Hard Rain’s A-Gonna Fall’ in his place.

At one point during the performance, Smith falters, apologizes, and says she is nervous. The audience applauds and she continues.

Her humility shows her for the class act that she is. She is human and imperfect. Her rendition of the song is wrought with emotion, and for me, that is much more important than perfection.

Enjoy, and I hope your week is a great one,

~eden

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Music Monday honors Bob Dylan ~ I Want You

I’m continuing with Bob Dylan for the rest of 2016, and unlike the previous two weeks, I’ve chosen a different type of song. It’s neither political commentary nor an anthem of change.

Don’t get me wrong. This is Dylan. It’s still a complex song.

“I Want You” is lyrically rich, though I’ll admit I only ever remember the happy melody and repetitively longing chorus.

“… I want you, I want you
Yes, I want you so bad
Honey, I want you …”

These words take up space in my brain over the more intricate lines in the song. They stir me because of their passionate simplicity, as if to say: “Nothing else matters, and I’d give up everything to be with you.”

It’s madness, and yet, who would not want to hear these words spoken to them?

It’s coming to the end of the year, and it’s not been an easy one for many of us. Maybe it’s best to let rationality slip away for a while, if only for the time it takes to listen to this song.

Enjoy your week,

~eden

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Music Monday honors Bob Dylan ~ Things Have Changed

Following up on the same theme with Dylan’s “The Times They Are A-Changin'” from last week, we move to this song, released in 2000.

“Things Have Changed” hailed from the soundtrack for Wonder Boys. It won the Academy Award and the Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song.

It’s another fitting song for the times. Here is the last verse.

” …  I hurt easy, I just don’t show it
You can hurt someone and not even know it
The next sixty seconds could be like an eternity
Gonna get lowdown, gonna fly high
All the truth in the world adds up to one big lie
I’m love with a woman who don’t even appeal to me

Mr. Jinx and Miss Lucy, they jumped in the lake
I’m not that eager to make a mistake

People are crazy and times are strange
I’m locked in tight, I’m out of range
I used to care, but things have changed.”

Have a good week,

~eden

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Music Monday honors Bob Dylan ~ The Times They Are A-Changin’

Since 1901, the Swedish Academy has annually awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in memory of donor, Alfred Nobel.

On October 13th, it honored Bob Dylan as its latest recipient. The last time an American received the prize was in 1993 with Toni Morrison.

The Academy cited Dylan’s work as “having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition.”

I have mixed feelings about his victory.

Don’t get me wrong. I think Bob Dylan is brilliant. I value his contributions to music, culture, poetry, and I love many of his songs. I would not dare downplay his talent.

No, my thoughts have to do with whether he should be given a prize that has been traditionally awarded to a writer of fiction and non-fiction.

It hardly seems like a level playing field to measure the song lyric against prose.

Prose presents itself naked on a page while the lyric is dressed up with voice or instrumentation or both.

As an author who struggles to create with only words, I know how difficult it is to produce a story, poem, or novel, and I empathize with writers because of this.

Bob Dylan is an incredible songwriter—perhaps the best, but is he a writer of literature? I don’t believe so.

Regardless, I want to honor him and his music over the coming weeks, for the simple reason that his songs remain as relevant today as they were when he first wrote them. That is an amazing feat when you consider they span a career of more than fifty years.

I was surprised to discover that after writing nearly 300 music posts, I’ve blogged Bob Dylan only three times, and just once on his own with “Blowin’ in the Wind” as part of my Harmonica series.

The other two times were in a group with “My Back Pages” and “End of the Line” with the Traveling Wilburys.

In light of the recent American election results, this classic of Dylan’s is once again, prophetic of changing times.

Here we see him performing for President Obama at the White House (Feb. 2010) in celebration of music from the Civil Rights Movement.

Is it me, or do you feel a twinge of irony in this?

Wishing all a peaceful week,

~ eden

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Music Monday flows with The Traveling Wilburys

Hello from Indonesia!

Here’s my view of coconut trees and rice fields as I write this blog.

rice fields

This is a departure from my previous music series that highlighted songs from my yoga classes.

I’m in Bali for a writers’ festival, yoga, and research for my next book—A Fragile Truce.

While on my recent flight from Toronto to Houston, I scanned the albums available to help me sleep  for the 3 1/2 hour flight. It was night time and the first leg of what was to be a thirty-plus hour journey to Bali.

The only album of interest to me was The Traveling Wilburys, a band which included Bob Dylan. He recently won the Nobel Prize for Literature (in case you didn’t know). I’ll be featuring the music of Mr. Dylan in a future month.

As I sat on that plane leaving the country, these three verses of “End of the Line” spoke to me , even above the roar of the airplane’s engines.

” …Well it’s all right, even when push comes to shove
Well it’s all right, if you got someone to love
Well it’s all right, everything’ll work out fine
Well it’s all right, we’re going to the end of the line

Don’t have to be ashamed of the car I drive (End of the Line)
I’m just glad to be here, happy to be alive (End of the Line)
It don’t matter if you’re by my side (End of the Line)
I’m satisfied

Well it’s all right, even if you’re old and gray
Well it’s all right, you still got something to say
Well it’s all right, remember to live and let live
Well it’s all right, the best you can do is forgive …”

I hope you find your own meaning in these lyrics. My next blog will be Toning my Mind, Body and Time Travel, which continues my Mind Body series.

Have a wonderful week. I know I will.

~eden

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Music Monday with My Back Pages – THANK YOU (Part 2)

Since this is part 2, you know there was a part 1. If you missed it, please find it here.

“My Back Pages” is the perfect song for this Music Monday post for two reasons.

Firstly, in the back matter of many books, you’ll find an author’s thanks. So … this is my thanks to those who’ve helped with the promotion of Stranger at Sunset AND my recent free books—The Lottery and Unlocking the Mystery.

Secondly, this song echoes a sentiment I’ve been feeling of late, and that is …. The older I get, the less I know.

HUGS to those who’ve downloaded my books, paid or free, and reviewed them. Your reviews mean a lot to me and help me reach more readers, so THANK YOU. 

 * * *

Connect to all the wonderful people who’ve supported me in the past months and include them in your network.

Book review on Goodreads by Lydia Aswolf

Reblog by Jamie B. Musings

Guest blog for Junying Kirk

An interview with author, Raymond Bolton

In “Conversations LIVE” with podcaster, Cyrus Webb

Guest blog for author Jessica Subject

Guest blog for author Lisette Brodey

Reblog by Stephen Moran

I chat with a full cast on Live from the Morgue

I’m interviewed by Naida on The Bookworm

Stranger at Sunset book blast via Masquerade Tours

I am interviewed by Maria Savva on Goodreads

Guest blog with author, Casey Sheridan

Guest blog with author, Ingrid Hall

Author Spotlight with Reading Renee

Review of Stranger at Sunset by Reading Renee

Author Spotlight with The Pen and Muse

Review of Stranger at Sunset on Literary Litter

Review of Stranger at Sunset on The Minding Spot

I’m interviewed by author, Bill Kirton, part 1 & part 2

I’m interviewed by Loren Kleinman of Huff Post Books

Stranger at Sunset is part of new releases in Crime Fiction Lover

I’m interviewed by OmniMystery News

Review of Stranger at Sunset by 6 Feet Under Books

Review of Stranger at Sunset by The Young Folks

I’m interviewed by author Dahlia Donovan

Stranger at Sunset is in the spotlight for Celtic Lady Reviews

Review of Stranger at Sunset by author, Jo Armstrong via Ingrid Hall

Review of Stranger at Sunset by Minding Spot

I’m interviewed by R.B. Wood for The Word Count Podcast 

Review of Stranger at Sunset on Long and Short Reviews

I’m interviewed by author D.A. Bale

I’m interviewed by Casey Ryan for the Cutting Room Floor Podcast

Review of Stranger at Sunset by Book Babe

Review of Stranger at Sunset by English Bibliophile

Review of Stranger at Sunset on 2 sites by Ski-Wee’s Book Corner (1) & (2)

I’m interviewed by Book Goodies

Review of Stranger at Sunset by Crime Fiction Lover

The Lottery featured on Karen Einsel’s blog

The Lottery featured on Stephen Moran’s blog

Reblog by C.P. Bialois

I’m interviewed by The Indie View

* * *

“Ah, but I was so much older then,

I’m younger than that now.”

–Bob Dylan

The following people have continued to share my books across their social networks and support me. They are a diverse group of: authors; bloggers; reviewers; designers; marketers; filmmakers; podcasters; artists; and of course—readers. 

In no particular order, I present some of the best people to have in your social network. I’ve linked them, so visit them and say “hi.” 🙂

Lisette Brodey
William Kendall
Karen Einsel
J.B. Graphics
Christoph Fischer
Billy Ray Chitwood
John Dolan
Larry Enright
Victoria Dougherty
Tim Dittmer
Rick Enriquez
Bill Kirton
Rob Schreck
Darcia Helle
R.B. Wood
Sessha Batto
Lydia Aswolf
Joe Hefferon
Maria Savva
Wyatt McIntyre
Carolyn Arnold
John Anstie
Steven M. Grant
Loren Kleinman
Christoph Paul
Alex Greenwood
Justin Bog
Annetta Ribken
Patti Larsen
Carol Romanella
Laurie Smith
Rob “Sharky” Pruneda
Efrain Nadal De Choudens
Casey Ryan
Cyrus Webb
Dannie C. Hill
Savannah Chase
Nicole Chardenet
Robert Chazz Chute
Rachel Thompson
Pavarti K. Tyler
The Bloody Munchkin
Sue Nador
Britt Skrabanek
Angus Vieira
BadRedhead Media
Sid Kali
Badass Marketing
Dom Portalla
Scott Leisk
2Life
Ken Flott
Wally Lane
Doreen Cox
Crime Fiction Lover
Michael Grimes
Lance Smith
Maxwell Cynn
Diantha Jones
Tony McManus
Marcella Selbach
Dean Harkness
Metal Queen Management
Michael Gabriel
Suzanna Burke
Karin Jacobson
Nanci Rathbun

 **

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Music Monday takes poetic license with LAY DOWN SALLY

It’s National Poetry Month, so I’d like to talk about “poetic license” in songs.

A writer who takes poetic license deviates from the correct use of language to express himself/herself. Poets do this to achieve the effects of rhyme, meter, or some other desired outcome.

Did Eric Clapton and Bob Dylan, two iconic songwriters take poetic license when they misused the words LIE vs LAY in their songs? I’m not sure. These words are often confused with one another.

Clapton’s “Lay Down Sally” is grammatically incorrect. You lay down an object, but in the song, he’s talking to Sally and what he really wants is for her to lie down.

It’s the same with Dylan’s “Lay Lady Lay.” The correct title should be “Lie Lady Lie,” though Dylan’s version rolls off the tongue much more easily.

Bad grammar aside, these songs are forever etched in my brain as they were written. I’d feel pretty foolish to sing them any other way.

Please share any songs you know where the writer has taken poetic license with the title or lyrics.

In the meantime, enjoy “Lay Down Sally,” and I hope you have a great week.

~eden

* * * *

 

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Harmonica Monday with Bob Dylan

It’s Thanksgiving weekend in Canada, and I was north of the city practising my harmonica while kayaking.

“Blowin’ in the Wind” is one of the tunes I played while contemplating the world. 😉

If you love Bob Dylan, pick up Fall into Winter, one of my books that includes harmonica and mentions Bob Dylan too.

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fall into winter border1

Buy links: 

US | UK | Canada | Germany | France | Japan | Italy | Spain

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